Tag Archives: reading veterinarian

FLYING WITH YOUR PET THIS HOLIDAY?

Below is a helpful checklist for your flight: BEFORE YOU GO TO THE AIRPORT ❏ BOOK YOUR PET on your flight by speaking directly with a person at the airline. No U.S. domestic carrier allows online booking of pets. Clarify whether your pet will be flying in-cabin with you or as checked baggage/cargo. ❏ CAREFULLY INSPECT THE CARRIER/CRATE. Check all zippers, seams, locks, screws and connections. If there are any structural problems, purchase a new crate or carrier before flying. IF YOUR PET WILL BE FLYING AS CHECKED BAGGAGE OR CARGO ❏ FLY NON-STOP TO YOUR DESTINATION, if at all possible. ❏ PURCHASE ZIP TIES online or at your local hardware store (approximately $5.00 US for 100). Pack them so they will be readily accessible at the airport. ❏ DRILL HOLES at the top, bottom and both sides around the door of the crate. This will allow you to add the zip ties. AFTER the Transportation Security Administration’s inspection of the crate. ❏ POST YOUR CELL PHONE NUMBER ON ALL SIDES OF THE CRATE, with instructions (in English and Spanish) to contact you immediately if needed for the handling of your pet. ❏ Post a sign that says “DO NOT OPEN EXCEPT IN EMERGENCY & ONLY IN AN ENCLOSED ROOM” on top of the crate, above the door. (Include Spanish translation as well.) AT THE AIRPORT – CHECKING IN ❏ REQUIRE THAT TSA SCREENING BE DONE INSIDE A SECURE ENCLOSED ROOM. When checking in, have the ticket agent call a TSA agent over or ask where to take the crate to a TSA security station for inspection to be done before handing your pet over to the airline for travel. ❏ After TSA inspects the crate they will place a Homeland Security tag on the carrier or crate. IF YOUR PET WILL BE FLYING AS CHECKED BAGGAGE OR CARGO ❏ APPLY ZIP TIES to the door and sides of the crate to further secure your pet after the TSA inspection. ❏ ASK THE AIRLINE PERSONNEL TO IMMEDIATELY NOTIFY YOU if any additional security checks are needed. ❏ ASK where your pet will be kept until loaded. AT THE AIRPORT – AT THE GATE ❏ If your pet is travelling in the cabin, KEEP THE CARRIER SECURELY CLOSED. Do not risk losing your pet now! IF YOUR PET WILL BE FLYING AS CHECKED BAGGAGE OR CARGO ❏ GO TO YOUR GATE AND WATCH THE CRATE BEING LOADED. USDA regulations state that pets are last to load and first off the plane. ❏ TELL THE GATE AGENT YOU ARE WAITING for your pet to be loaded before you board the plane. ❏ KEEP YOUR CELL PHONE ON until the very last minute. AT THE DESTINATION AIRPORT ❏ UPON ARRIVAL, MAKE SURE YOUR PET’S CRATE was taken off the plane. ❏ DO NOT REMOVE YOUR PET FROM THE CARRIER until you are in a secure location HAVE A GREAT TRIP!

Please join us! The next part of our FREE seminar series is on Monday night Dec. 3rd

We are very excited to welcome Betsy Gallagher from Hill’s Pet Nutrition. Betsy’s workshop is titled: How to Read a Pet Food Label (feel free to bring your labels with you!) Betsy Gallagher RD, LDN Betsy is a licensed, Registered Dietitian with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She holds her bachelor’s degree in nutrition and food science and her master’s degree in nutrition education. In 2000, Betsy was recognized in the “Top Docs for Women” issue of the “Philadelphia Magazine.” The same year Betsy decided to focus her expertise in companion animal nutrition and began working for Hills Pet Nutrition. With her background in the science of nutrition, Betsy’s goal is to help pet parents make educated choices when choosing a food for their pets. She feels that there is an overwhelming amount of misinformation that marketing firms are using to sell pet food products. Betsy believes that by focusing on the facts, and looking for the science to support health and marketing claims, we can better care for our pets’ nutritional needs. Betsy enjoys spending time with Mitzi, her (awesome) adopted Jack Russell terrier. She also enjoys horseback riding on her ranch and playing tennis with her husband and two children. All sessions take place Monday evenings from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Bernville Veterinary Clinic, 7135 Bernville Road, Bernville, PA 19506 The workshops are FREE, but space is limited, so please RSVP to vet@bernvillevet.com or 610-488-0166

As You Start Planning for Thanksgiving, Beware!

 
Pets and turkey skin
TURKEY SKIN. Seems harmless enough, right? It’s just the skin, right? Well not really. High-fat foods, such as turkey skin, can be hazardous to your pet. Since the skin is hard to digest, it can lead to pancreatitis in dogs (symptoms are vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain). It can also cause diarrhea in cats. The skin isn’t good for you either (but that’s a conversation for a different day)!

EMERGENCY POWER OUTAGE ALERT

We understand that there many homes in our community still without power! Being that the temperature is dropping and we are expecting another storm, we will offer free boarding for pets from homes which have lost power. This offer is only for pets from homes without power and we will extend this offer through this Friday night November the 9th. Dogs and cats from all members of the community without power are welcome so please help us share this information. Please call before coming in to confirm that we have enough space. 610.488.0166.

OUR NEXT FREE SEMINAR IS ON MONDAY NOV 5th!

Please join us! The next seminar is on Monday night, 11/5/12 at Bernville Veterinary Clinic: Canine & Feline Behavior, with Dr. Lee Pickett ■Normal canine & feline social development and communication ■Canine behavior problems, including aggression and separation anxiety ■Feline behavior problems, including inappropriate elimination, aggre ssion and clawing furniture All sessions take place Monday evenings from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Bernville Veterinary Clinic, 7135 Bernville Road, Bernville, PA 19506 The workshops are FREE, but space is limited, so please RSVP to vet@bernvillevet.com or 610-488-0166

Pet Halloween Alert: The Danger of Xylitol Sweetener

Xylitol toxicity in dogs Does your dog have a sweet tooth? Does he drool at the thought of sharing that deliciously sweet snack with you? Now there is one more reason to keep the sweets all to yourself. The sweetener xylitol is toxic to dogs. It has been known to cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in dogs for years, but recently it has been discovered that it can cause acute liver disease and a coagulopathy (inability to clot the blood). A study found that 0.5g/kg or more of ingested xylitol can cause liver failure. What does this mean in the real world? One piece of sugar free gum with xylitol has around 0.3g of xylitol in it. Some gums can have as much as 1g of xylitol per piece. If you bake with the xylitol powder one cup has 190g of xylitol. If a recipe calls for 1 cups of xylitol to make 24 cup cakes, it will only take 2 cupcakes to cause acute liver disease in a 50lb dog. What are the signs of xylitol toxicity? Vomiting is usually the first sign of toxicity and then in 30-60 minutes hypoglycemia can occur. The signs of hypoglycemia can be lethargy, ataxia (stumbling around), collapse, and seizure. In cases where gum with xylitol was ingested the hypoglycemia may be delayed for up to 12 hours. In severe over doses some dogs do not display the signs of hypoglycemia prior to the onset of liver failure. Instead lethargy and vomiting occurred 9-72 hours after exposure. They developed petechia (small spots of bleeding on the skin and mucus membranes like gums), echymosis (larger spots of bleeding seen on the skin and mucus membranes), and gastric hemorrhage (bleeding in the stomach). What can you do if your dog does ingest xylitol? Immediately bring him into us and let us know which items contained xylitol. Remember how much you pet consumed (always estimate on the high side because it is always better to be overly cautious when it comes to the health and wellbeing of your faithful friend). The moral of the story is to keep the sweets up and away from your furry friend. Xylitol may help you watch your waist line, but it can be deadly to your furry friend.

Pet Storm Tips

Power outages often happen during storms, but can happen at any time, during any season. Flashlights, batteries, food, a source of water and heat during the winter are basic necessities. Are your pets covered in your preparedness plan? Here are some power outage preparedness tips: •Thankfully, dogs and cats do not need much electricity in their daily lives. Fresh water and food are most important, so basic emergency precautions should cover those needs. If your pet is arthritic and cold weather is a concern, have plenty of padded, thick blankets for your pet to curl up on. •While not an emergency, often when the power is out, many appliances start beeping and flashing. This really bothers some animals so try to keep pets out of those rooms. •Water Supply: Besides having stored drinking water, it is also important to maintain sanitation for both family members and pets. Have some baby wipes handy to keep hands clean and not waste available water. •Food Supply: Keep readily available, easy-to-store snacks that do not require refrigeration or heating to eat. •Light Your Way: Have matches, candles, flashlights, and batteries on hand, and know where they are. A dedicated location works well. It is a good idea to periodically check that batteries are working in stored flashlights. •Be Candle and Fire Safe: Lit candles are useful for light, but having many lit candles can be dangerous. If pets and small children are around, there is even more danger of accidental fire or injury. Fire is also a risk with downed lines and sparking sub stations. Make sure to have plenty of fire extinguishers around the house, and know how to use them. Make sure that extinguishers are fully charged, and know where they are in the house and around your property.

SAVE THE DATE: OUR NEXT FREE SEMINAR IS ON NOV 5th!

Please join us! The next seminar is on Monday night, 11/5/12 at Bernville Veterinary Clinic: Canine & Feline Behavior, with Dr. Lee Pickett
  • Normal canine & feline social development and communication
  • Canine behavior problems, including aggression and separation anxiety
  • Feline behavior problems, including inappropriate elimination, aggression and clawing furniture
All sessions take place Monday evenings from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Bernville Veterinary Clinic, 7135 Bernville Road, Bernville, PA 19506 The workshops are FREE, but space is limited, so please RSVP to vet@bernvillevet.com or 610-488-0166