Tag Archives: pet

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants For Pets

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants For Pets Now that the weather is getting nicer, you may be thinking about your garden. This list, complied by the ASPCA, contains plants that have been reported as having systemic effects on animals and/or intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Please note that the information contained in our plant lists is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather a compilation of the most frequently encountered plants. If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance, contact us. http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plants  

This Coming Sunday is Pet Fire Safety Day!

              July 15th is Pet Fire Safety Day. We shudder to think about it, but according to the National Fire Protection Association, each year more than 1,000 house fires are accidentally started by pets. As part of National Preparedness Month, we suggest you take a minute to pet proof your home against potential fire hazards—it could mean the difference between life and death for your four-legged friends.Below are a few tips from the ASPCA about ways that you can protect your pet. Secure wires and cords. Cats are especially interested in playing with anything that looks like string. Keep electrical wires and power cords secured and out of your pet’s reach. Blow it out. Don’t leave lit candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock the candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders placed on a stable surface. Want to be really safe? Consider using only flameless candles. Cover it up. Pets are naturally curious and will investigate almost anything that has a scent. This includes your oven. Be sure to remove stove knobs or protect them with covers before leaving the house. Believe it or not, exploring stove tops is the number one way your pet can accidently start a fire. Go crazy with the detectors. There is no such thing as too many smoke detectors. In fact, you should have at least one on each floor of your home. Out a lot? Consider using monitored smoke detectors. These systems send an immediate alert to a call center letting them know smoke has been detected. Stick ‘em up. Contact your local fire department to get a pet rescue sticker. It alerts rescue personnel that animals are inside your home. Write down the number of pets inside and attach the sticker to a front window or door.

Ask the Vet’s Pets: Heatstroke can kill dogs even in moderate weather!

Dear Daisy Dog: My small mixed-breed dog, Eddie, had a close call with heatstroke – inside my apartment on a day that was warm but not hot. I partially opened the windows when I left for work, and when I got home, I was shocked to find Eddie lying on his side panting, his eyes glazed over. I rushed him to the veterinarian who gave him emergency treatment for heatstroke. Please warn your readers about this danger. Daisy Responds: Thank you for sharing your harrowing experience. Even when it’s only moderately warm outdoors, the interior of a home or car can quickly become an oven. Heatstroke, an excessively high body temperature, can cause brain damage, kidney failure and, in half its canine victims, death. We dogs are particularly susceptible because we can’t regulate our body temperatures very well, especially if we’re young, old, overweight, have breathing difficulties, or have heart disease or other medical problems. Signs of heatstroke include rapid breathing and heart rate, vomiting, diarrhea – and then collapse. Treatment is aimed at lowering body temperature and preventing damage to the brain and other organs through intravenous fluids and medications. If Eddie ever has a repeat episode, spray him with a garden hose or immerse him in cool water – but not ice water – before you transport him to the animal hospital. Once he’s in the car, position him by the air conditioner vents.