Tag Archives: microchip

National Pet Identification Week

It’s National Pet Identification Week — the perfect time to make sure you’ve taken every precaution to be reunited with your pet if he or she becomes lost. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) recently found that only 33 percent of pet parents admitted to always having ID tags on their dogs and cats.In addition to that crucial step, pet owners should also have their furry friend microchipped. Collars with pet identification are accessible to anyone who finds your lost pet. But, tags can become hard to read, and collars can be broken or removed. Microchipping your pet is a method of permanent identification. Microchips cannot be easily misread, and the permanent identification number is tamperproof. The information about the pet and owner is usually readily retrievable.A microchip is a very tiny transponder that is encoded with a unique identification number. Before insertion, the sterile microchip is scanned in the package to confirm that the identification code of the transponder matches that shown on the label of the bar code on the package.
Credit: Web Vet

Celebrate National Microchip Day in Berks County

Tomorrow, August 15th, is National Check the Chip day. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Animal Hospital Association have joined together to celebrate pets with microchips and to promote microchipping of pets that do not have them. Microchips are very small identification devices (slightly larger than a grain of rice) that contain vital information about your pet and you, the owner. It is permanently implanted under the skin, between the shoulder blades of dogs and cats and can be “read” through the skin by a microchip scanner. The scanner reveals a number which can be looked up in a database of owner’s names, phone numbers, addresses and other emergency contact information. Microchips are crucial in helping lost animals find their way home. Most recently, microchips played a huge role in finding homes of dogs and cats affected by the tornadoes in Oklahoma. When lost or stray pets were presented to the local humane societies, doctors and staff scanned the animals and were able to look up owners’ information linked to the microchip number. Thousands of pets were reunited with their families. For more information on microchips and registration, click on the following link: https://www.avma.org/Events/pethealth/Pages/Check-the-Chip-Day.aspx

Microchip your Pet in Berks County!

It’s important to get your pet microchipped; but it’s just as important to make sure that microchip contains the correct information in order for your four-legged friend to get home. That’s why the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) are teaming up to encourage pet owners to update their pet’s microchip information on National Check the Chip Day, Aug. 15. Almost 9.6 million pets are euthanized every year because their owners can’t be found, according to the American Humane Association. While tags and collars are important, microchipping is a valuable method because the microchip won’t wear out, tear, slip off or become lost. How does a microchip work? The microchip, which is about the size of a grain of rice, is injected by a veterinarian or veterinary technician just beneath your pet’s skin in the area between the shoulder blades. This is usually done without anesthesia, and the experience can be compared to getting a vaccination. Each microchip has a unique registration number that is entered into a database or registry, and is associated with your name and contact information. If your lost dog or cat is found by an animal hospital, shelter or humane society, they will use a microchip scanner to read the number and contact the registry to get your information. Make sure you can be found, too While it may be comforting to know the microchip won’t get lost or damaged, and that it will probably last the pet’s lifetime, the microchip is useless if you’re not updating your contact information with the registry. If your pet has been microchipped, keep the documentation paperwork so you can find the contact information for the registry. If you don’t have the documentation paperwork, contact the veterinarian or shelter where the chip was implanted. Keep in mind there are more than a dozen companies that maintain databases of chip ID numbers in the U.S. By using AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup at petmicrochiplookup.org, you can locate the registry for your chip by entering the microchip ID number. If you don’t have your pet’s microchip ID number, have a veterinarian scan it and give it to you. Only about 17% of lost dogs and 2% of lost cats ever find their way back to their owners. Prevent the heartache and ensure your pet has an up-to-date microchip