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Bernville Vet’s July 4th Pet Safety Tips

Fourth of July safety tips from our friends at the ASPCA: For many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard on the Fourth of July with good friends and family—including the four-legged members of the household. While it may seem like a great idea to reward Rover with scraps from the grill and bring him along to watch fireworks, in reality some festive foods and products can be potentially hazardous to your pets. ◾Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become very intoxicated and weak, severely depressed or could go into a coma. Death from respiratory failure is also a possibility in severe cases. ◾Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. Ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems. ◾Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pets’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. If lighter fluid is inhaled, aspiration pneumonia and breathing problems could develop. ◾Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pets severe indigestion and diarrhea. This is particularly true for older animals who have more delicate digestive systems and nutritional requirements. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals. ◾Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers. ◾Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestions can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression. If inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia in pets. ◾Never use fireworks around pets! While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals. ◾Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.

Microchip your Pet in Berks County!

It’s important to get your pet microchipped; but it’s just as important to make sure that microchip contains the correct information in order for your four-legged friend to get home. That’s why the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) are teaming up to encourage pet owners to update their pet’s microchip information on National Check the Chip Day, Aug. 15. Almost 9.6 million pets are euthanized every year because their owners can’t be found, according to the American Humane Association. While tags and collars are important, microchipping is a valuable method because the microchip won’t wear out, tear, slip off or become lost. How does a microchip work? The microchip, which is about the size of a grain of rice, is injected by a veterinarian or veterinary technician just beneath your pet’s skin in the area between the shoulder blades. This is usually done without anesthesia, and the experience can be compared to getting a vaccination. Each microchip has a unique registration number that is entered into a database or registry, and is associated with your name and contact information. If your lost dog or cat is found by an animal hospital, shelter or humane society, they will use a microchip scanner to read the number and contact the registry to get your information. Make sure you can be found, too While it may be comforting to know the microchip won’t get lost or damaged, and that it will probably last the pet’s lifetime, the microchip is useless if you’re not updating your contact information with the registry. If your pet has been microchipped, keep the documentation paperwork so you can find the contact information for the registry. If you don’t have the documentation paperwork, contact the veterinarian or shelter where the chip was implanted. Keep in mind there are more than a dozen companies that maintain databases of chip ID numbers in the U.S. By using AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup at petmicrochiplookup.org, you can locate the registry for your chip by entering the microchip ID number. If you don’t have your pet’s microchip ID number, have a veterinarian scan it and give it to you. Only about 17% of lost dogs and 2% of lost cats ever find their way back to their owners. Prevent the heartache and ensure your pet has an up-to-date microchip

Veterinary Medicine for Pet Owners

Bernville Veterinary Clinic continues its “Veterinary Medicine for Pet Owners” series with a seminar on Dermatology scheduled for Monday evening, July 1, from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Topics include allergic skin disease, ringworm and those creepy crawly things — fleas, ticks and mites.

Dr. Lee Pickett will present the seminar at the Bernville Veterinary Clinic, Pet Spa & Resort, 7135 Bernville Road (Route 183), Bernville. The workshop is free and open to all, but space is limited, so please RSVP by calling 610-488-0166 or emailing vet@bernvillevet.com.

Berks County’s Wyomissing History

The original inhabitants of Wyomissing, in Berks County, were Indians from the Lenni Lenape tribe who lived along the banks of the Wyomissing Creek. The word Wyomissing is a phonetically derived the Indian name for the area whose exact meaning is unknown, but most likely means “a place of flats” which makes much sense considering how flat Wyomissing is compared to nearby surrounding areas. Much of Berks County was transfered from the Indians to William Penn in 1685. Title to the land that much of Wyomissing is built upon was in two parcels, an eastern tract and a western tract, which were divided by a northwesterly line in the vicinity of Lake Avenue. One of the earliest industries in the area was the Evans Grist Mill. This building still stands at the corner of Old Mill Road and Old Wyomissing Road. To learn more, go to: http://www.co.berks.pa.us/Muni/Wyomissing/Pages/EarlyHistory.aspx

Grey Muzzle Foster Program Seminar

Saturday, April 27 – Grey Muzzle Foster Program Seminar 1:00pm at the shelter Did you ever consider fostering a dog or cat?? Well now is your chance to become informed. Please attend our fostering seminar given by Marcy Tocker, Foster Coordinator at the Animal Rescue League, and Vicky Hoffman who has fostered dogs for shelters and various dog rescues over the past 14 years. You will learn how easy it is to become a “foster parent.” www.berksarl.org