Category Archives: pet safety

Dog Bite Prevention

Dog Bite Prevention (for more info, go to: https://www.avma.org/public/pages/Dog-Bite-Prevention.aspx)
Dog Bite Facts:
  • Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the U.S. are bitten by dogs.
  • Almost 1 in 5 people bitten by dogs require medical attention.
  • Every year, more than 800,000 Americans receive medical attention for dog bites; at least half of them are children.
  • Children are, by far, the most common victims of dog bites and are far more likely to be severely injured.
  • Most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities and while interacting with familiar dogs.
  • Senior citizens are the second most common dog bite victims.
There are many things you can do to avoid dog bites, ranging from properly training and socializing your pet to educating your children on how – or if – they should approach a dog. Information and education are the best solutions for this public health crisis.

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants For Pets

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants For Pets Now that the weather is getting nicer, you may be thinking about your garden. This list, complied by the ASPCA, contains plants that have been reported as having systemic effects on animals and/or intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Please note that the information contained in our plant lists is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather a compilation of the most frequently encountered plants. If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance, contact us. http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plants  

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well. To learn more, go to: www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Plants Potentially Poisonous to Pets

More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant. Cats, for instance, are poisoned by any part of a lilly. Download a list of plants that are poisonous to pets (PDF) »

Know Your Pet’s Limits in the Cold

This is a great tip from the AVMA:

Just like people, pets’ cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Be aware of your pet’s tolerance for cold weather, and adjust accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you both from weather-associated health risks. Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling.

Pets, Pine Needles and Trees

Make sure that you clean up fallen pine needles around your tree regularly. If eaten, these needles can puncture your pet’s intestines. Make sure your tree is well secured for your pets, for people and for your delicate décor. You can anchor your tree to the wall, using strong cord or rope. Also, make sure that your pet can’t access the tree’s water