All posts by cvp

What is the rabies risk for my pet?

What is the rabies risk for my pet? Any animal bitten or scratched by either a wild, carnivorous mammal or a bat that is not available for testing should be regarded as having been exposed to rabies.
Unvaccinated dogs, cats, and ferrets exposed to a rabid animal should be euthanized immediately. If the owner is unwilling to have this done, the animal should be placed in strict isolation for 6 months and vaccinated 1 month before being released. To learn more, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/pets/index.html

National Pet Identification Week

It’s National Pet Identification Week — the perfect time to make sure you’ve taken every precaution to be reunited with your pet if he or she becomes lost. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) recently found that only 33 percent of pet parents admitted to always having ID tags on their dogs and cats.In addition to that crucial step, pet owners should also have their furry friend microchipped. Collars with pet identification are accessible to anyone who finds your lost pet. But, tags can become hard to read, and collars can be broken or removed. Microchipping your pet is a method of permanent identification. Microchips cannot be easily misread, and the permanent identification number is tamperproof. The information about the pet and owner is usually readily retrievable.A microchip is a very tiny transponder that is encoded with a unique identification number. Before insertion, the sterile microchip is scanned in the package to confirm that the identification code of the transponder matches that shown on the label of the bar code on the package.
Credit: Web Vet

CAUTION: Lilies can be highly dangerous to cats!

CAUTION: Lilies can be highly dangerous to cats! Easter is this weekend and we want to remind you about lilies being VERY dangerous to cats. To be safe we recommend that all cat owners avoid lilies altogether, both inside and out. The potentially fatal lilies are true lilies, including Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter, and Japanese Show lilies. These are all highly toxic to cats. Even small ingestions (such as chewing on the pollen, petals or leaves) can result in kidney failure and death. Some other varieties of lilies are a little more benign: Peace, Peruvian, and Calla lilies contain oxalate crystals that cause minor signs of illness, such as tissue irritation in the mouth, tongue, pharynx, and esophagus, which, in turn, causes minor drooling. Much the same as the more commonly recognized danger of poinsettias. Cats that consume any part of a lily require immediate medical care to effectively treat the poisoning. If you see your cat eating, or even chewing on a lily, you should contact your veterinarian immediately. Swift treatment and decontamination is imperative in the early toxic stage. Additionally, aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, kidney-function monitoring tests, and supportive care can greatly improve prognoses. Please share this important information with all of your cat loving friends.

EPA Message about Fleas and Ticks

How to Protect Against Fleas and Ticks

  • Consult your veterinarian about the best way to protect your pets from fleas and ticks and whether pesticides are even needed.
  • Use a flea comb to suppress adult fleas. It will allow hair to pass through the comb’s teeth but not the fleas, removing fleas and “flea dirt.” 
    • Focus on combing those parts of the pet where most fleas gather, often the neck or tail area.
    • Put any fleas in soapy water to kill them.
For more information, go to: http://www2.epa.gov/pets/controlling-fleas-and-ticks-your-pet

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well. To learn more, go to: www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Tick Removal

If you find a tick attached to your skin, there’s no need to panic. There are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers will remove a tick quite effectively.

How to remove a tick

  1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal.
  3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.
For pictures, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/removal/index.html

FOX CONFIRMED POSITIVE FOR RABIES

FOX CONFIRMED POSITIVE FOR RABIES Where: 2000 BLOCK OF WEBER ROAD, LANSDALE, PA 19446 Anyone that has been bitten or scratched by, or had saliva exposure to a skunk must receive treatment to prevent this fatal disease. If you and your pet were in Montgomery County recently or if you, someone in your household, or any of your pets have possibly had contact with a skunk or any other stray or wild animal, immediately call the Montgomery County Health Department, Division of Communicable Disease Control at (610) 278-5117.

What Is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal condition caused by parasitic worms living in the arteries of the lungs and occasionally in the right side of the heart of dogs, cats and other species of mammals, including wolves, foxes, ferrets, sea lions and (in rare instances) humans. Heartworms are classified as nematodes (roundworms) and are filarids, one of many species of roundworms. Dogs and cats of any age or breed are susceptible to infection.

Native Dog Breeds of Ireland

Native Dog Breeds of Ireland Over the centuries Ireland has bred and developed dogs with characteristics and physical structure to serve them in their everyday life. From the obviously named Wolfhounds and pack Beagles, the Setting and Retrieving gun-dogs to the terriers used for vermin control and herding, all of them are recognised internationally as the breeds of dogs whose origins are uniquely Irish.
  • Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier
  • Irish Red Setter
  • Irish Red and White Setter
  • Irish Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
  • Irish Terrier
  • Irish Water Spaniel
  • Irish Wolfhound
  • Kerry Beagle
  • Kerry Blue

Plants Potentially Poisonous to Pets

More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant. Cats, for instance, are poisoned by any part of a lilly. Download a list of plants that are poisonous to pets (PDF) »